CS4123 Theory of Computation. A99
Syllabus

Prof. Carolina Ruiz
Department of Computer Science
Worcester Polytechnic Institute



COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Building on the theoretical foundations from CS 3133, this course addresses the fundamental question of what it means to be "computable," including different characterization of computable sets and functions.

Topics include the halting problem, the Church-Turing thesis, primitive recursive functions, recursive sets, recursively enumerable sets, NP-completeness, and reducibilities.


CLASS MEETING:

Mo, Tu, Th, Fr 9:00 - 9:50 a.m.
Classroom: AK219


PROFESSOR:

Prof. Carolina Ruiz
ruiz@cs.wpi.edu
Office: FL 232
Phone Number: (508) 831-5640
Office Hours:
Mo. 11:00 - 11:50 am
Th. 10:00 - 10:50 am, or by appointment


TEACHING ASSISTANT:

Peter S. Leveille
psl@wpi.edu
Room: FL A20
Office Hours:
Mo 3:00 - 4:00 pm
Tu 11:00 - 12:00 m
Fr 10:00 - 11:00 am

Messages sent to cs4123_ta@cs.wpi.edu reach both the professor and the TA.


TEXTBOOK (required):


RECOMMENDED BACKGROUND:

CS 3133 Foundations of Computer Science.


GRADING AND ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY:

Exam 1 25%
Exam 2 25%
Exam 3 25%
Homework 25%
Class Participation Extra Points

You are encouraged to discuss the homework with your classmates, but you should develop and write your own solutions. You should explicitly acknowledge any sources of ideas used that are not your own; this includes books, web pages, etc. Failure to identify non-original work is considered academic dishonesty. Collaboration or other outside assistance on exams is not allowed.

Your grade will reflect your own work and achievements during the course. Any type of cheating will be penalized with an NR grade for the course and will be reported to the WPI Judicial Board. See http://www.WPI.EDu/Pubs/Policies/sect5.html for the WPI's Academic Honesty Policy.


EXAMS

There will be a total of 3 exams. Each exam will cover the material presented in class since the beginning of the term. In particular, the final exam is cumulative. The exams are scheduled for Sept. 10, Sept. 24, and Oct. 12. All exams will be in-class, closed-book, individual exams, unless otherwise noted.

HOMEWORK

Homework will be due Sept. 7, Sept. 21, Oct. 5, and Oct. 11. Solutions to the homework will be made available soon after homework is collected, so no late homework will be accepted. You are encouraged to discuss the homework with your classmates, but you should develop and write your own solutions.

QUIZZES

Pop quizzes may be given during the term. Be prepared!

CLASS PARTICIPATION

Students are expected to attend class and to read the material assigned to each class in advance. Class participation will add extra points to students' grades.

CLASS MAILING LIST

The mailing list for this class is: cs4123@cs.wpi.edu

CLASS WEB PAGES

The web pages for this class are located at: http://www.cs.wpi.edu/~cs4123/1999a/
Announcements will be posted on the web pages and/or the class mailing list, and so you are urged to check your email and the class web pages frequently.

ADDITIONAL SUGGESTED REFERENCES

The following additional references complement and/or supplement the material contained in the required textbook.
  1. Christos H. Papadimitriou, ``Computational Complexity'', Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 1994.

  2. H.R. Lewis and C.H. Papadimitriou, ``Elements of the Theory of Computation''. Second edition. Prentice Hall, 1998.

  3. M.R. Garey and D.S. Johnson, ``Computers and Intractability: A Guide to the Theory of NP-Completeness''. W.H. Freeman, 1979.

  4. J.E. Hopcroft and J.D. Ullman, ``Introduction to Automata Theory, Languages, and Computation''. Addison Wesley, 1979.

  5. T.H. Cormen, C.E. Leiserson, R.L. Rivest, ``Introduction to Algorithms''. McGraw-Hill, 1989.

  6. H. Rogers, ``Theory of Recursive Functions and Effective Computability''. The MIT Press, 1987.

WARNING:

Small changes to this syllabus may be made during the course of the term.